Table of Contents
Insights || Colin Whyte

Look under the covers at America’s greatest book store.

Playlist || Malcolm Johnson

Golden Dust, Dirt, Rust & Trust: A Pick Up Worth of Sound for the Soul.

Insights || Lisa Richardson

Growing up & growing pains: Can a garden town all get along?

Conversation || Zaria Forman

From Brooklyn to the ends of the earth, a compelling artist with a chill perspective dives deep into details.

Reflections || Trevor Komori

Forge on! Meet the man with a fire for recycling.

Legacy || Full Press Staff

Father, Son & the Whole Case of Scotch.

Insights || Andrew Findlay

Sometimes a cure is closer than you think.

“I’ve always been drawn back to where I grew up, and to live the same way we did when we were younger.”

Photo: Jeremy Koreski

Sounds from Around

Playlist || Malcolm Johnson
Malcolm Johnson

Hailing from Vancouver Island, B.C., Malcolm Johnson lives with his family in Ventura, California.

@malcolmrjohnson

Much of filmmaker Keith Malloy’s life has been spent in front of the lens rather than behind it.

As the middle brother of California’s famed Malloy surfing family, Keith’s high-profile surfing career kept him on the road almost non-stop. Like his brothers Chris and Dan, he eventually became interested in directing his own projects—first the bodysurfing film Come Hell or High Water, and now a documentary called Fishpeople that features six diverse individuals who have devoted their lives to the sea.

Although Fishpeople looks at people who are deeply focused on the ocean, Keith himself has found a more balanced existence with his family on a small farm in the rolling hills of the central California coast. These days, his passion is telling people’s simple stories of daily life—a direction echoed by his playlist of down-home, plainspoken country tunes.

Keith Malloy's Playlist:


Mama Tried Merle Haggard Spotify   iTunes
The Juarez Device Terry Allen Spotify   iTunes
Southside of Heaven Ryan Bingham Spotify   iTunes
Long White Line Sturgill Simpson Spotify   iTunes
My Good Gal Old Crow Medicine Show Spotify   iTunes
Murder in the City The Avett Brothers Spotify   iTunes
Hands of Time Margo Price Spotify   iTunes
Launch YouTube Playlist

“I’m amazed by the knowledge the generation before us has, so I’m always looking for people who have lived a full life and can talk about those experiences. There’s so much beauty and colour to take in.” 

Malloy on the set of Fishpeople, his second film as director. Photo: Donnie Hedden/Patagonia

Malloy on the set of Fishpeople, his second film as director. Photo: Donnie Hedden/Patagonia

MJ || What’s your typical day like when you’re not travelling?

KM || I have two little daughters, so I usually wake up, make the kids breakfast, and make some coffee for my wife. Then I’ll go down and feed the animals. We’re on a little farm now with horses, cows and chickens. Later on, I’ll do some work stuff or do projects around the property, and then in the afternoon I’ll run down and catch a surf if I can. In the last few months, I’ve only surfed six or so times—I was in a cubicle finishing Fishpeople for hours on end, and then travelling with the film tour to the point where it’s made me dizzy.

Fishpeople tells the stories of a unique cast of characters who have dedicated their lives to the sea

MJ || After travelling so much, what is it that makes you want to be where you’re at?

KM || It’s funny; I did a ton of travelling, lived in Hawai’i for a long stretch and spent enough time in Europe and South America to really see what those places and cultures are like. But I’ve always been drawn back to where I grew up, and to live the same way we did when we were younger, on just enough land to have a few animals and get in a little bit of trouble. I really love central California, and I love the landscape and the temperatures of the water and the air. I’ve always felt comfortable here.

Waiting for a boat to deliver him to Tofino

Waiting for a boat to deliver him to one of Tofino, B.C.’s fiercely-guarded, hidden surf breaks. Photo: Jeremy Koreski

MJ || Your bodysurfing film, Come Hell or High Water, came to represent a simpler approach to surfing—and by extension, to the rest of life. Was that something you were conscious of at the time?

KM || I think it was. I really got into bodysurfing in the middle of my professional surfing career. I was getting burnt out and losing a bit of that fun factor that I had when I first started surfing. Bodysurfing was this amazing outlet to have—still being in the ocean and enjoying it, but not having to push so hard to shred a 6-foot thruster. I could go out there and have no motive other than having fun, and just enjoy what I was doing in a simple and basic way, like you do when you’re a kid. And in the end, what beats that?

MJ || It’s interesting mentioning that kid-like enjoyment, because you also seem to work to include a lot of older people in your projects.

KM || Those people are so fascinating to me. There’s a bodysurfer we put in the first film—we’d stumbled across this footage of him bodysurfing so long ago, and it was so cool to see this form of riding waves being the same as it was in the ‘50s. And then when you get to talk to these people, you find there’s so much to learn from and be inspired by. I’m pretty amazed now by the knowledge that the generation before us has, so I’m always looking for people who are up there in age, have lived a full life and can talk about those experiences. There’s so much beauty and colour to take in. I love kids and youngsters, too, but when you listen to older people, there’s that deeper layer of inspiration, and usually some soul searching too.